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Posts Tagged ‘asian dessert’

I remember as a kid, my sis and I would follow my mum to the stockbroking firm and after that to the supermarket nearby. Outside the supermarket, 2 brothers would setup a stall in their van selling apam balik – this is a crispy pancake that’s a little bit fluffy in texture, stuffed with roasted peanuts, you can get some with sweetened creamed corn in it. My sis in particular loved their apam balik. There’s another version called ban jian kuih – similarly, it’s filled with roasted peanuts, but it’s soft and fluffy in texture, and a bit thicker than apam balik. I got this recipe from aunty lily’s blog and it was great. My many attempts before this were flops as I couldn’t get the crispy texture that goes “crunch” when you bite into it. This recipe was awesome!

Ingredients:

  • 170 gm all purpose flour
  • 100 gm rice flour
  • 30 gm corn flour
  • 2 tsp double action baking powder
  • 1/2  tsp baking soda
  • 1/2  tsp salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla essence
  • 150 gm sugar
  • Water

Filling:

  • Peanuts, roasted and chopped finely
  • Melted butter
  • Caster sugar

Method:

  • Mix all the ingredients together. Add water till a watery batter is formed and flows freely down, then strain and leave it in the fridge overnight.
  • Heat a non-stick pan over medium heat. 
  • Ladle some batter onto pan till it coats pan all over especially the edges. Drain off excess batter. 
  • When batter is no longer wet and runny, brush melted butter over the top and drizzle with sugar and roasted peanuts on one half of the apam balik. 
  • When the bottom is golden brown, fold the pancake into half and place on plate to cool. It’ll become crispy when it has cooled.
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    Piggy Shanghai Mooncake, originally uploaded by pearlyn83.

    papa&mama pig, originally uploaded by pearlyn83.

    This is a long overdue post. I made these last week for Mid-Autumn Festival but haven’t had the time to post this. I was going to make Shanghai pancakes the traditional way in a dome shape, but came across this recipe in Cooking is My Passion blog. It looked so cute so I decided to test my creative side!

    The red bean paste was made a couple of days ahead and chilled in the refrigerator. The pastry made fresh to be served as dessert on Wednesday night as we had friends over to celebrate Mid-Autumn Fesival together. We bought some commercial mooncakes a couple of weeks ago and they were packaged in nice metallic boxes. Hence I used the boxes to pack some piggy mooncakes as gifts for close friends. I had lotsa fun forming the pig shapes as it was my first time. Krystal tried her hands at making a couple and we tried making some girlie pigs (which if you look carefully can be distinguished by the ribbon near its ears).

    Red Bean Paste

    Ingredients:

    • Red bean
    • A handful of rice
    • Sugar
    • Dried orange peel

    Method:

    • Soak red bean and rice in water overnight.
    • Drain and bring to boil in a pot (non-stick preferably). Add sugar and orange peel and simmer red bean over medium heat until dry.
    • Add oil and fry till dry. Make sure red bean’s still a bit moist and not fully dry. If it’s too dry, when you use it as a filling and bake it, the result’s not too good.
    • Leave to cool and store in refrigerator.

    Shanghai Mooncake

    Ingredients:

    Yellow Dough:

    • 1/2 cup flour
    • 3 tbsp melted butter

    White Dough:

    • 1 cup flour
    • 3 tbsp butter
    • Pinch of salt
    • Water, enough to form soft dough
    • Egg yolk + water, to glaze

    Method:

    • Preheat oven to 180C. Line baking tray with baking paper.
    • Mix ingredients for both dough in 2 separate bowls.
    • Form white dough into a ball and roll out on a floured work area.
    • Roll it out to a flat rectangular piece. Place yellow dough in the middle and fold the white dough to wrap the yellow dough.
    • Roll it out then fold to overlap each other.Repeat the step for another 2 – 3 times.
    • Roll dough swiss rolls style. Use a dough cutter and slice into 1 inch thick pieces. Flatten each piece with the palm of your hands or a rolling pin.
    • Place a spoonful of red bean paste in the middle and wrap it up. Form into a pig shape.
    • Glaze with egg yolk and bake in oven till brown.

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    strawberry jelly mooncake, originally uploaded by pearlyn83.

    strawberry jelly mooncake, originally uploaded by pearlyn83.

     

     

    I thought Mid-Autumn Festival (also commonly known as Mooncake Festival in Malaysia) is tomorrow. As I didn’t have a Chinese calendar, I relied on the date CY gave me but we all got our days mixed up and invited people over tomorrow night for dinner! Oh well… For those of you who do not know, Mid-Autumn Festival is celebrated by Asians – especially Chinese all over the world on the 15th day of the 8th lunar month of the Chinese calendar. People gather together and celebrate the event by eating mooncakes and pomelo, playing lanterns, burning incense etc. There are many different mooncake flavours: lotus paste (with single or double yolk/ without yolk), mixed nuts, red bean etc. In recent years, people are getting more creative by coming up with ice-cream mooncakes, mooncake jellies etc.

    When I was younger, I didn’t enjoy mooncakes. Maybe it was because my dad used to get lots from clients etc and we were forced to eat it for 2-3 meals a day for months, hence I grew really sick of it. However, I loved mooncake festival because of the lanterns. I remember running around with the kids in my neighbourhood: each of us with our own lantern in different shapes and colour. Some are paper lanterns while others are wired ones shaped in various shapes and lined with coloured glass paper. As I grew older, the tradition was still practiced and we would go out with friends to the parks around our housing estate, as a lot of the housing estate committee organise family events at some parks to celebrate the festival. Sadly, I’ve not done this for 5 years – since coming to Tassie. 😦

    I only started to like mooncake as I grew older. My favourite is the white lotus paste with double yolk. Actually, I only want the yolk..hehe… :)! I’ve tried a couple of times to make some homemade ones but I’ve not succeeded up till today. Last year, I managed to make Snowy Mooncake (Bing Pei Mooncake). This year, while surfing Kuali.com, I came across this jelly mooncake recipe. It looked really pretty so I decided to give it a go. The jelly on its own without the custard filling was a bit overwhelming. But with the custard filling, it turned out pretty nice.

    Ingredients:

    Filling:

    • 55g water
    • 125ml fresh milk
    • 55g sugar
    • 5g agar-agar powder
    • 55g double cream

    Strawberry jelly skin:

    • 250ml water
    • 80g castor sugar
    • 11g agar-agar powder
    • 100g strawberry, hulled
    • 150ml water
    • 1 tbsp evaporated milk
    • 3 tbsp thick coconut milk
    • 1/8 tsp red food colouring
    • 1 tsp basil seeds, soaked to soften

    Method:

    • Bring water, sugar, milk and agar-agar powder to a boil.
    • Reduce the heat and simmer until sugar and agar-agar have dissolved. Stir in double cream and whisk continuously.
    • Remove from flame and continue to stir to prevent lumps from forming.
    • Pour into tart moulds and leave to cool. Chill in refrigerator till set.
    • Put strawberries and 150ml water in a blender. Blend until fine, then set aside.
    • Bring water, sugar and agar-agar powder to a boil. Reduce the heat and add strawberry mixture, evaporated milk, coconut milk and basil seeds. Cook over a gentle heat until mixture comes to almost a boil again, then turn off the heat.
    • Fill the mooncake mould half full with the strawberry mixture. Leave it to cool until almost set then put one piece of the custard filling in the middle.
    • Use a fork and lightly scratch the surface of the filling and fill up with the strawberry agar-agar mixture again and let it set completely before chilling in the refrigerator.
    • Lightly knock it out of the mould and serve chilled.

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