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Archive for October, 2007

vanilla ice cream, originally uploaded by pearlyn83.

Woohoo! I finally made vanilla ice cream – all natural and pure in taste. My first attempt at making Cookies ‘n’ Cream ice cream was a disappointment thanks to the vanilla ice cream. Ah Koh said it tasted slightly better than Homebrand ice cream (this is the cheap brand of products in Woolworths) but nothing in comparison to other commercially made ice cream. That was a big slap on my face! Ouch!

Hence, began my journey in discovering the best way to produce vanilla ice cream. This round, I used vanilla beans and not vanilla essence to make the ice cream. And voila, vanilla ice cream like you’ve never tasted before! The fragrance and the sweetness of vanilla beans was so strong – you can’t help but want more of it!

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 cups skimmed milk
  • 4 medium egg yolks
  • 6tbsp caster sugar
  • 1tsp corn flour
  • 1 vanilla bean pod
  • 1 1/4 cups double cream

Method:

  • Bring milk to boil in a saucepan. Scrape vanilla beans from the pod and throw in the vanilla pod which has been scraped into the milk as well.
  • Set aside to cool completely.
  • In the meantime, whisk egg yolk, sugar and cornflour until thick and foamy. Bring milk to boil again and then whisk gradually into the yolk mixture. Pour the combined mixture back into the saucepan.
  • Cook the mixture over low heat until thicken, stirring continuously. Mixture should be able to coat the back of a wooden spoon. Do not allow mixture to boil or it will curdle. Remove from heat and continue to stir for about 5 minutes.
  • Pour mixture into a bowl, leave the vanilla pod in it and cover with clingwrap. Allow it to cool completely before refrigerating. Chill custard for at least 12 hours. Remember to chill ice cream maker bowl for at least 18 hours before using (unless yours is the maker which does not require pre-chilling).
  • Pour custard and cream into ice cream maker. Churn till mixture thickens and resembles the soft cone serves you get from McDonald’s. Pour into container and chill for 4 hours before serving.

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supreme pork chop, originally uploaded by pearlyn83.When I was a kid, my parents used to bring me to Esquire Kitchen for dinner. I loved their pork chop noodles there. This recipe, once again, is from my Hawkers’ Fair Simplified book. Sweet and sour in taste, it was perfect with rice.Ingredients:

  • Pork fillets
  • Oyster sauce
  • Sugar
  • Salt
  • Sesame oil
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tbsp plain flour
  • 1 tbsp custard powder
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 200 ml water
  • Corn flour

Sauce:

  • Tomato sauce
  • Chilli sauce
  • Worcestershire sauce
  • Curry powder
  • Sugar
  • Salt
  • Soy sauce
  • Water

Method:

  • Use the blunt edged side of the cleaver and pound the pork chops till tender and approximately 5-10 mm thick. Add in all the marinade except for the corn flour and season for a few hours or overnight.
  • Take the pork fillets out from the fridge and mix well with corn flour.
  • Heat oil for deep frying. Deep fry till golden brown. Dish and drain on paper towel.
  • Mix sauce ingredients together in a bowl. Bring to slight simmer in a wok. Add in pork fillets and mix well. Dish up and serve.

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tau foo fa (soy bean custard), originally uploaded by pearlyn83.

I absolutely LOVE tau foo fa! I used to be able to eat it for 3 meals a day! :) For those of you who don’t know, tau foo fa is an asian dessert made from soy beans. It’s a very versatile dessert – can be served hot or cold, sweet or savoury. Different asian countries serve it differently – in Malaysia it’s served with white sugar/palm sugar syrup; a friend of mine from China said in her hometown, it’s served with spicy chilli bean sauce; Ryan said he had one in Sydney done Yin and Yang style with black sesame paste; my mum used to take the leftovers and serve with garlic and onion sauce for dinner – see..it’s really versatile and can be served however you want.

Ingredients:

  • 300g soy beans
  • 2400ml water
  • 3 tbsp corn flour
  • 1 tsp gypsum powder
  • 3/4 bowl water
  • Sugar and Palm sugar (gula melaka)
  • Pandan leaves

Method:

  • Soak soy beans 5-8 hours.
  • Blend with water and strain. Bring to boil in  a large pot.
  • While the soy bean milk is boiling, mix the corn flour, gypsum powder and 3/4 bowl water together.
    Pour the mixture into a large pot/slow cooker. Wrap the lid with a tea towel.
  • When the soy bean milk comes to a boil, pour it into the pot with the gypsum mixture. Cover the lid and leave it to set for 30 minutes.
  • In the meantime, prepare the sugar syrup. Bring the white sugar and palm sugar to boil with water and pandan respectively in 2 saucepan till it thickens.
  • Uncover the lid and ladle into bowls. Serve with sugar syrup.

Note:

  • Try to use a big pot that’s heat proof or that retains as much heat as possible when setting the tau foo fa. I use a slow cooker. If you don’t have one, wrap a big pot with a tea towel and place in a box or something to retain the heat.
  • Use a flat ladle when scooping the tau foo fa. My mum got me this special ladle from Malaysia but if you don’t have one try using a turner.

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Doughnut

 

doughnut, originally uploaded by pearlyn83.

doughnuts on a stick, originally uploaded by pearlyn83.

 

Every Malaysian kid grew up eating these sorta doughnuts – soft, fluffy and coated in sugar. They are a bit different from the ones you get from Krispy Creme and Donut King. The Malaysian ones are less floury in comparison, and are generally coated with sugar/chocolate icing or thousands coloured candies. Whereas the ones you get from Krispy Creme/Donut King, are generally covered in multi-colour icing and filled with different flavoured fillings.

 

Ryan got me a bread recipe book from Malaysia. My first batch of doughnuts were a flop – instead of nice and round doughnuts, I produced flat ones! Haha! :) Learning from my first failure, my second batch turned out perfect – at least in my opinion it was perfect! Within the night itself, it was cleaned out. Ryan told me it was because it was too addictive – so you can’t help but take one after another.

 

Ingredients:

 

Dough A:

  • 300g high protein flour
  • 200g plain flour
  • 80g caster sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 20g milk powder
  • 10g instant yeast

Dough B:

  • 230ml water
  • 1 egg
  • 40g shortening

Method:

  • Combine ingredients for dough A together. Make a well and add in ingredients for dough B. Knead well to form smooth dough.
  • Gradually knead in the shortening and knead into smooth, elastic dough.
  • Place into a bowl, cling wrap and cover with tea towel and set aside to proof till double in size.
  • Once dough has doubled in size, punch it down and peel off bit by bit to form into small golf-size balls. Set aside and allow it to proof till double in size for a second time.
  • Heat oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Drop doughnuts in and fry till golden brown. Remove and place on paper towels. Fill a bowl with caster sugar and coat doughnuts with it while it’s still hot.

Note:

  • If you have a mixer, just put the ingredients in and allow it to beat till a smooth dough is form.
  • To know if a dough has proofed enough, press a finger into dough and withdraw quickly. If it leaves a deep impression and springs back very slowly, then it’s ready.

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deep fried special bean curd, originally uploaded by pearlyn83.

deep fried special bean curd, originally uploaded by pearlyn83.

 

I got this recipe from the Hawkers’ Fair Simplified book my mum bought me. Krys and I made these together but ours obviously didn’t look as good as the one in the picture. But the taste was nevertheless not compromised. Every piece was wiped out and it was praises all around.

Ingredients:

  • 2 pieces of soft bean curd
  • 2 pieces of egg bean curd
  • 150g fish paste
  • Fresh coriander, chopped
  • Carrots, chopped
  • Red chillies, chopped (optional)
  • Chicken stock granules
  • Salt & pepper
  • Corn flour & oil for deep frying

Method:

  • Mash soft and egg bean curd until fine. Add in the remaining ingredients and mix well.
  • Pour mixture into a greased pan and steam in a wok till set.
  • Leave aside and allow it to cool.
  • Cut into pieces. Coat the pieces with corn flour and deep fry
  • Dipping sauce: Mix chilli sauce and mayonnaise in a bowl.

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ayam percik – pre-grill, originally uploaded by pearlyn83.

ayam percik – post-grill, originally uploaded by pearlyn83.

ayam percik, originally uploaded by pearlyn83.

Selamat Hari Raya Aidilfitri to all my Muslim friends! To those who do not know, Hari Raya Aidilfitri also known as Hari Raya Puasa literally means Fasting Day of Celebration. This is because during the month before Hari Raya – the Ramadan month, it is compulsory for Muslims to fast from dawn to dusk. Hence, at the end of the month, they celebrate by gathering with family members and friends to feast together.

I’ve mentioned in my previous post that during the Ramadan month, many food bazaars will pop up all over the place, selling delicious food. Last time, one of my favourite and a must every time I visited the bazaars was Ayam Percik – a Malaysian East Coast specialty. It’s a Malay style chicken which is marinated in a spicy coconut gravy and traditionally BBQ-ed over charcoal. Yum!

This is a long overdue post. During the Ramadan month, Krystal was tempting me for days with photos of Ramadan bazaars posted in various blogs, making my mouth water and craving getting stronger daily. I couldn’t control my craving any longer, hence decided to create my own Ayam Percik. Our friends (Duy and Jeeuk) invited us over to his place for dinner – but instead of them cooking, I was to cook there. Since Jeeuk missed nasi lemak a lot, I made sambal and served it with coconut rice.

    Ingredients:

    • Chicken Maryland
    • 2 Teaspoons Tamarind Pulp
    • Lemon Grass,(bruised)
    • 1 Cup Water
    • 1 Cup Thick Coconut Milk
    • 1 1/2 Tablespoons Sugar
    • Salt to Taste

    Marinade:

    • Salt
    • Sugar
    • Chili Powder
    • Turmeric Powder

    Spice Paste:

    • Candlenuts
    • Garlic
    • Dried Chillies, soaked in Hot Water
    • Red Chillies
    • Ginger
    • Shallots

    Method:

    • Mix the marinade, combine with the chicken and season overnight.
    • Chop the spice paste ingredients and blend finely.
    • Heat Oil in a frying-pan and fry the spice paste, tamarind and lemon grass for 5 minutes. Add water and cook for another 3 minutes. Add coconut Milk, sugar and salt and simmer over a medium fire for 5 minutes.
    • Barbecue the chicken over a low charcoal fire or under a grill, basting frequently with the gravy, until the chicken is cooked.

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    Sushi & Inari

    sushi, originally uploaded by pearlyn83.

    inari, originally uploaded by pearlyn83.If I had to say what my favourite food is, I’ll probably have to say Japanese food. When I was a kid, I hated fish, especially Chinese style fish (eg the steam and fried fish you get at Chinese restaurants). Up till today, I’m still not a fan of it and would avoid it as much as possible. However, weird as it sounds, I loved sashimi – raw tuna being my favourite! When we were staying in Mauritius, we had a family friend who was the best sashimi chef. The raw tuna that goes through her knife, comes out thinly sliced, fresh and “melts” in your mouth. Hhmmm….In Malaysia, my favourite place for Japanese buffet is at the Renaissance Hotel. In my opinion, they have THE best jap buffet! They have a wide selection of japanese food – ranging from sushi, california rolls, sashimi, teppanyaki, desserts etc. Yum! Unfortunately, Tassie had no good jap restaurant until lately. When Orizuru first opened at Mures Fish Centre, they were really good. Sadly, the quality of the food there has dropped tremendously. Thankfully, Kawasemi opened in Moonah or else, there goes my source of good jap food.I learned to make sushi in my first year here. Over the years, after trialling over and over again, I’ve come to realise that the best way to prepare sushi rice is in a saucepan over medium-low heat. Remember to cool the rice fully. DO NOT ever serve hot sushi rice.Ingredients:

    • 300g Japanese short grain rice
    • 330ml water
    • 4 tbsp Japanese rice vinegar
    • 2 tbsp sugar
    • 1/2 tsp salt
    • Japanese bean curd/tofu skin
    • A few sheets of nori seaweed
    • Fresh raw salmon/tuna
    • Prawns
    • Avocado
    • Carrots
    • Wasabi and soy sauce

    Method:

    • Wash rice and drain well with a sieve. Put the rice and water in a saucepan, cover the lid and bring to boil over medium heat. When you hear the sound of boiling coming from the pot, lower the heat and allow it to simmer for a further 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and allow to stand with lid on for another 10 minutes.
    • In the meantime, prepare the vinegar mixture. Heat vinegar, sugar and salt in a saucepan till sugar and salt dissolves. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool.
    • Transfer the rice into a large, clean bowl. Slowly pour the vinegar mixture into the rice and with slicing motions, coat the rice with the vinegar. Set aside to cool completely.
    • Boil carrots to soften them then slice into thin slices. Slice avocado and raw salmon/tuna into thin slices. Bring a kettle to boil and soak prawns for about 5-10 minutes.
    • Prepare a bowl of water with a few drops of vinegar in it and lay out the sushi mat. Wet your hands with the vinegar water (this is to prevent the rice from sticking to your fingers). Place a sheet of seaweed and use your hands to spread rice evenly. The filling is laid out at the bottom of the seaweed. With your finger, spread some wasabi along the rice. Place carrots, wasabi, prawns/tuna/salmon across horizontally.
    • Slowly lift the mat with the seaweed and ingredients and lightly press and roll at the same time. As you roll, lightly press the sushi so the shape forms properly.
    • Cut into thin slices with a sharp knife that’s been wet slightly with the vinegar water. Lay out on serving plate.
    • Use your hands and form small rice rolls. Spread a little wasabi and top with a slice of raw salmon/tuna.
    • Drain inari sheets properly. Form medium size rice rolls and slowly slit open the middle compartment. Stuff it with the rice roll and spread a little wasabi. Seal the edges and lay out on serving plate.
    • Serve with wasabi and soy sauce (and preserved ginger slices if you want). Itadakimas!

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